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Rambling on about money.....

I have put aside some of today to de-clutter. Despite a frugal lifestyle my house seems to get cluttered. I also mentioned in my blog a couple of days ago that it is furnished with second hand and re-cycled furniture and appliances. All very cheap but come without guarantees and often erratic in performance!

As with any home, maintenance is also a concern and much of my house could do with sprucing up a bit and making sure that things get to work as they should (many of mine don’t!).


In line with my strategy of leading a “sustainable” (aka Skinflint) existence one of my tasks today will be to carrying out my house “audit” i.e, listing what needs doing, what I have available and laying out a strategy to meet any skills and materials gaps. My intention is to remove things that I don’t use or that I am unlikely to – these will go to freecycle or my local RSPCA shop if of any use.


I aim to replace, maintain and repair my household on a zero budget. I shall report back on my audit and progress over the coming weeks and hope that it can provide an example of an alternative to the wastage and expense of consumerism.


I’ll also be looking at local trading schemes, the nature of money and looking at how goods and services have been exchanged in Coventry over the centuries. As part of my research this morning I entered the search “Coventry Coinage” into Google just to see what initially came up. Among the usual adverts and irrelevant results was an entry for Baldwin’s Auction House. On offer for £475 was a coin minted in Coventry with the following description:


“Edward IV first reign (1461-70), Groat, Coventry Mint, light coinage (1464-70)

Obverse: Facing crowned bust, quatrefoil either side of neck, C on breast struck over an E, reuse of an old York obverse die, within tressure of nine arcs, large fleurs on cusps, initial mark sun (1467-70). Reverse: Long cross, dual concentric inscriptions around trio of pellets in each inner angle, 2.47gms (N.1581; S.2008).

Clipped round, the C on breast more like an E, with Coventry mint reading on reverse, a muled rarity, toned very fine”


The Coventry Mint was in the City centre on the site of the present Golden Cross pub – an interesting historic building in its own right.


I’ll continue to take a look at money and the local economy over the next week including local currencies, philanthropists, wage struggles and the influence of national and international factors on Coventry’s economy over the centuries.


For the time being I must set upon my audit and then ramble on......

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